Curator contacts

Jon Bialecki

is a fellow in the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh. His work has been published in edited volumes and academic journals, such as the South Atlantic Quarterly, American Ethnologist, Anthropological Theory, Current Anthropology, and the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. His first book, A Diagram for Fire: Miracles and Variation in an American Charismatic Movement (U California Press), won the 2017 Sharon Stephens Prize awarded by the American Ethnological Society.


Email: jon.bialecki@gmail.com
James S Bielo

James S. Bielo

is assistant professor of Anthropology at Miami University (Oxford, Ohio, USA). He is the author of four books, most recently Ark Encounter: The Making of a Creationist Theme Park (NYU Press, 2018). He is founder and co-curator of Materializing the Bible, a digital scholarship project that explores the social life of scriptures, religious tourism, and material religion. And, he is founder and co-editor of ‚ÄúAnthropology of Contemporary North America,‚ÄĚ a University of Nebraska Press book series.


Email: bielojs@miamioh.edu
Naomi Haynes

Naomi Haynes

is a Chancellor’s Fellow and Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. She is coeditor of the Current Anthropology special issue The Anthropology of Christianity: Unity, Diversity, New Directions and of the Social Analysis special issue Hierarchy, Values, and the Value of Hierarchy. Her first book, Moving by the Spirit: Pentecostal Social Life on the Zambian Copperbelt, was published in 2017 by the University of California Press.


Email: Naomi.Haynes@ed.ac.uk
Hillary Kaell

Hillary Kaell

is author of Walking Where Jesus Walked: American Christians and Holy Land Pilgrimage (NYU Press, 2014) and editor of Everyday Sacred: Religion in Contemporary Quebec (McGill-Queens University Press, 2017). Her current project examines the development of a global Christian imaginary through the lens of child sponsorship programs. She contributes regularly to the New Books in Religion podcast and is co-editor of the Society for the Anthropology of Religion’s book series at Palgrave Macmillan press. She is associate professor of religion at Concordia University in Montreal.


Email: hillarykaell@gmail.com
Candace Lukasik

Candace Lukasik

is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis, and earned her PhD in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research sits at the intersection of religion and migration, with a focus on Middle Eastern Christianity, U.S. geopolitics, and Muslim-Christian relations. For her first book project, she has received a Religion, Spirituality, and Democratic Renewal Fellowship for 2020-2021, funded by the Social Science Research Council and the Fetzer Institute.

 


Email: cblukasik@wustl.edu
Leanne Williams Green

Leanne Williams Green

is a Junior Research Fellow (Title A) at Trinity College, Cambridge. She received her PhD in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of California, San Diego. Broadly, her research centers on morality, ethics and Protestant theology. She conducted fieldwork with Baptist churches in Harare, Zimbabwe, examining how these urban Christians reckon human responsibility and divine authority as they navigate a tumultuous economic and political climate. Her other interests concern the intersection of class and religion, and of middle class experiences in sub-Saharan Africa.

 


Email: lw679@cam.ac.uk

Sarah Riccardi-Swartz

is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Recovering Truth: Religion, Journalism, and Democracy in a Post Truth Era” project at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict (Arizona State University). She has a Ph.D. in Sociocultural Anthropology from New York University. After completing an honors B.A. and M.A. in Religious Studies (American religions) at Missouri State University, she¬†attended¬†NYU to study and research religion and politics in the United States from an anthropological perspective. Along the way, she obtained a graduate certificate in Culture and Media (ethnographic filmmaking) and an M.Phil in Anthropology from NYU. ¬†Her research interests primarily focus on new forms of conservatism, right-wing religious communities, fundamentalism and traditionalism, and the ever-expanding political tensions between Russia and the United States.


Email: sriccar1@asu.edu
Adam Marshall

Adam Marshall

is currently completing his PhD thesis in social anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. His research deals primarily with Khmer Evangelical Christians in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His research interests include ritual and religion, the anthropology of Christianity, Buddhism, spatiality and temporality, subjectivity and personhood, the anthropology of ethics, political anthropology, Cambodia, and Southeast Asia. Adam holds a BS in Civil Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, a Master of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary, and an MSc with Distinction in Social Anthropology from the University of Edinburgh. He currently and happily dwells in Edinburgh, Scotland with his wife and daughter.


Email: s1200481@sms.ed.ac.uk
Kyle Byron

Kyle Byron

is an anthropologist of religion and PhD student in the Department for the Study of Religion at University of Toronto. His research, grounded in the ethnographic study of street preaching troupes in several North American cities, focuses on the place of affect, emotion, and material/sensory culture in the study of religion.


Email: kyle.byron@mail.utoronto.ca